Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

When lawyers from Bihar sought his help in finding a solution for the plight of ryots exploited by the indigo planters who were all Europeans he went to Champaran to study the problem first hand.
He sought meetings with the planters but they were openly hostile. Government officials refused to cooperate and when he started meeting the ryots, the collector ordered him to leave Champaran. Gandhi refused and was hauled up in court.
Gandhiji was courteous to the officials, respectful to the court but firm in his resolve not to leave Champaran.
“As a law-abiding citizen my first instinct would be, as it was, to obey the order served upon me,” said Gandhi, in court. “But I could not do so without doing violence to my sense of duty to those for whom I have come. I feel that I could serve them only by remaining in their midst.”
He declared that he would submit without protest whatever penalty was imposed upon him.
The court was adjourned. The government officials were thrown into confusion. What do you do with a man who refuses to obey the law on moral grounds but agrees that the court should punish him and expresses willingness to submit to the punishment?
As Gandhi wrote later it looked as if it was the government and not Gandhi who was on trial.
The government beat a hasty retreat and allowed Gandhi to stay. Later Sir Edward Gait, the Lt. Governor asked him to serve as a member of the official committee of enquiry. The committee after the enquiry upheld the demands of the ryots.
The ryots wanted Gandhi to save them from the planters. Gandhi did that and more. He opened a school for their children and he taught them the value of cleanliness and basic hygiene.
In one of the villages he found the women dressed in filthy clothes. He asked his wife Kasturba to speak to them and she did. Later one of the women took Kasturba to her hut and said:
“Look, there is no box or cupboard here. The sari I am wearing is the only one I have. How am I to wash it? Tell Gandhiji to get me another sari. Then I promise to bathe and put on clean clothes every day.”
Thus Gandhi came face to face with the poverty of his people. He could take on the British. But could he help a poor woman get another sari?

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