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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Dr. Ambedkar was convinced that caste Hindus would not change their attitude towards his people unless they raised their collective voice in protest. He maintained that if his people had resisted the practice of untouchability, the caste Hindus would not have been able to force untouchability on them. He urged his followers to 'make the thoughtless think' and 'to make those who were thoughtful to act in conformity with their thoughts.'
Dr. Ambedkar set out to empower the Depressed Classes and when caste Hindus urged him not to press for a separate electorate, he laughed in their face and wondered why those who had kept his people out of the Hindu mainstream for so long were now beseeching them to stay within the Hindu fold.
Explaining why Gandhiji had to go on a fast unto death on the issue, the eminent sociologist, Dr. M.S. Gore writes: "....... he (Gandhiji) had not been able to change the attitude of the Hindu community towards the untouchables. Caught between the orthodoxy of his own followers and the militant demands of the newly–aroused untouchables, he had found no effective strategy."
Gandhiji's fast stirred the conscience of the Hindu community. As the fast progressed, temples began to throw open their doors to the Depressed Classes. At the Benaras Hindu University, brahmins led by principal Dhruva, dined publicly with street cleaners, cobblers and scavengers. In villages and towns, untouchables were given access to wells. The practice of segregation of untouchables and caste Hindus in classrooms was given up in many schools across the country.
Dr. Ambedkar was concerned about Gandhiji's fast. In a statement, he said: "I trust the Mahatma will not drive me to the necessity of making a choice between his life and the rights of my people. For I can never consent to deliver my people bound hand and foot to the caste Hindus for generations to come."
Mediators shuttling between Gandhiji and Ambedkar hammered out an understanding between the two leaders. Dr. Ambedkar agreed to give up his demand for a separate electorate and Gandhiji agreed to reservation of seats in the legislature for the Depressed Classes.
The country heaved a sigh of relief when Gandhiji ended his fast on 26 September 1932.

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