Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

This "accession of strength" resulted in the people challenging and defying the authority of the government. To go to prison or to get lathi blows from the police became a badge of honour, and not, as formerly, a brand of infamy.
British writer, Valentine Chirol who was a virulent critic of Indian nationalism remarked: "The question of partition itself receded into the background, and the issue…was not whether Bengal should be one unpartitioned province or two partitioned provinces under British rule, but whether British rule itself was to endure in Bengal or, for the matter of that, anywhere in India."
Chirol was not being melodramatic. Others too had come to the same conclusion. Dadabhai Naoroji who presided over the Calcutta Congress abruptly announced Swaraj as the goal of the Congress. Will Durant summed up the importance of the swadeshi movement with a cryptic remark: "It was in 1905, then, that the Indian Revolution began."
Writing about the swadeshi movement, in the Daily Chronicle, J. Ramsay Macdonald who later rose to become the first-ever Labour Prime Minister of Britain, observed, "....It is translating nationalism into religion, into music and poetry, into painting and literature... It is creating India by song and worship, it is clothing her in queenly garments... and from this surge of prayer and song and political strife will come India if India ever does come."

Swadeshi in Art and Literature

The swadeshi movement inspired art and literature and in turn the movement itself was sustained by the literature it helped to create. Songs of Rabindranath Tagore, Rajni Kant Sen, Subramania Bharati, Dwijendralal Ray, Mukunda Das, Syed Abu Mohammed and several others echoed throughout the land. Rabindranath Tagore's Amar Sonar Bangla became the national anthem of Bangladesh six decades after its composition. In art, Abanindranath Tagore and Nandalal Bose broke away from the Victorian naturalism and looked to the Ajanta, Rajput and Mughal paintings for inspiration.
Folk theatre forms such as Jatras were effectively used to spread the message of swadeshi. This period also witnessed the advent of Indian scientists like Jagdish Chandra Bose, and Prafulla Chandra Ray who achieved international recognition for their contribution to science.

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