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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

In the beginning Hindus were suspicious of the motives of the Wahabis. However, as the movement became increasingly political and anti-British, it gained sympathy and support of the Hindus some of whom were detained for their pro-Wahabi activities.
The movement which was undoubtedly religious in its origin, assumed the character of a class struggle in some places, especially in Bengal where irrespective of communal distinctions peasants united against their landlords. "The presence of Wahabis in a district," wrote Hunter, "is a standing menace to all classes…possessed of property."
The Government took stern measures to put down the Wahabis. Many leaders were put to death or transported for life.
In February 1872, the Viceroy Lord Mayo while on a visit to the prison on the Andamans was fatally stabbed by a prisoner called Sher Ali. Though no direct link could be established between Sher Ali and the Wahabis, Sher Ali came to be considered a martyr to the cause.

Kalki to the Rescue

In the early 1820's a religious mendicant at Badawar in Patiala declared himself to be Kalki, the last avatar of Lord Vishnu, who had come down to earth to drive away the British from India. The rebellion led by 'Kalki' was put down. When 'Kalki' was taken prisoner, a large number of Akalis tried to set him free but their attempt was thwarted by a contingent of cavalry. 
In Bundelkhand, Sheikh Dalla who led a revolt against the British in 1824–26, became a folk hero. People used to say:
Below is the Earth, up above is Allah. In between moves Sheikh Dalla.
In Bengal, a darvesh or mendicant, Karam Shah founded the sect called Pagal Panthis, (Mad Sect). In 1825 his son Tipu Shah led primitive tribes of Hajongs and Garos in an uprising against oppressive zamindars who collected illegal cess from tribal cultivators. Military operations on a large scale were necessary to put down the Pagal Panthis.
The Sanyasi rebellions and the Fakir rebellions rocked the East India Company government in the mid-18th century. Some of the prominent leaders of this movement were Gosain Himmat Giri, Fakir Majnun Shah and his son Chiragh Ali and Bhavani Pathak and Debi Choudharani. Bankim Chandra's celebrated novel ANANDMATH in which the song VANDE MATARAM came to be included was inspired by the Sanyasi rebellion.

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