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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Both the nationalistic movement and the revolutionary movement which shook the country out of its centuries-old slumber drew inspiration from Tilak's writings and utterances. Aurobindo Ghosh and Bipin Chandra Pal in Bengal, Lala Lajpat Rai in Punjab, Chidambaram Pillai and Subramania Bharati in the South, instituted nationalistic movements in their provinces.
Aurobindo described Nationalism as immortal. "Nationalism is not a trick of intellect," said Aurobindo." It is an attitude of the heart, of the soul. What intellect could not do, this mighty force of passionate conviction born out of the very depth of the national consciousness, will be able to accomplish."
The Nationalists distanced themselves from European liberals. Wrote Bipin Chandra Pal : "The time has come when in the interests of truth and civic advancement and freedom of the people, our British friends should be distinctly told that while we are thankful to them for all the kind things they have said all these years for us, and the ready sacrifices they have made to make our lot easy and their yoke light, we cannot any longer suffice to be guided by them in our efforts for political progress and emancipation. Their view-point is not ours." With this statement the nationalists cut the umbilical cord which connected the Indian political movement with the European liberals.
The Revolutionaries comprising young Indians also drew inspiration from Tilak. In 1897, when Rand, the plague commissioner of Pune was killed by the Chaphekar brothers, the Anglo-Indian press screamed for Tilak's blood and Tilak was arrested on charges of sedition. While the judge agreed that there was no connection between Rand's killing and Tilak's writings, he ruled that Tilak's writings showed absence of affection for the government. The judge concluded that the absence of affection meant hatred against the government.
The whole country followed Tilak's trial with bated breath. The Hindu reported: "From the early hours of the morning to late in the evening, crowds of people stood outside the offices of the Hindu, anxiously awaiting the latest news about Tilak. And when the telegram that he had been sentenced to 18 months' imprisonment was read out, oh, what grief, what anguish was seen on the faces around."
In a spontaneous reaction, mill workers struck work, shops downed shutters, students walked out of classrooms and the country saluted the man who had refused to apologize to the government, hailing him as "Lokamanya".
R.C. Majumdar sums up the mood of the time in this passage:
"The trial and conviction of Tilak may be regarded as a landmark in the history of nationalism. Henceforth, sacrifice and sufferings in the cause of the country, rather than eloquence and debating skill, came to be regarded as the badge of honour and distinction. The martyrs replaced mere orators as acknowledged champions of Liberty".

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