Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Return Ticket

Elphinstone, the Governor of Bombay worked hard to promote education in his presidency. Lt. Gen. Briggs who visited his camp one day saw in his tent a pile of Marathi books. When Briggs asked what the books were for, Elphinstone 
replied, "To educate the natives." Then he added with a grin, "But it is our high road back to Europe."

Intellectual Apathy

By 1857 there were hundreds of Indians educated in English and some of them had begun to organise themselves to fight for their rights.
Bengali intellectuals had already put forth the demand for Indianisation of the civil services and Indian representation in the British parliament. They had, by and large, accepted the fact of British rule and indeed, found merit in it.
So the great uprising of 1857 caught them unprepared and they were not at all inclined to support it. Three decades earlier Raja Rammohan Roy had said: "India requires many more years of English domination so that she might not have many things to lose while she is reclaiming her political independence."
What the Raja did not want India to lose were the ideals of liberty, patriotism and nationalism which were yet to take firm root in the Indian mind. Some people in 1857 might have felt the same way as the Raja did. Whatever the reason for the apathy of the educated class, it was one of the ironies of history that those who fought the British in 1857 had never heard of the principles of liberty and equality while those who were inspired by these lofty ideals were either not ready or willing to take on the British and watched disinterestedly from the sidelines.

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