Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

At Jhansi, Rani Lakshmibai whose kingdom had been annexed by the British under the Doctrine of Lapse, assumed command. At Jagadishpur Kunwar Singh, a 70–year–old veteran led the sepoys. Petty rajas, chieftains, talukdars, zamindars and anybody who had lost a piece of land or larger territory seized the opportunity that presented itself to regain their titles. Poor farmers who had lost their mortgaged land to moneylenders burnt the documents and repossessed their land. Looting and arson continued unabated. The predatory tribes for whom robbery was a hereditary vocation had a field day. While many Europeans were slain, many more were given shelter and were helped to reach places of safety. At some places, notably in Kanpur and Lucknow, the English took shelter in fortified buildings which soon came under attack by the sepoys. The Englishmen held on grimly and waited for help to arrive. Once the British had got over the initial shock they began to move their troops and re-group. Their first priority was to recapture Delhi for they knew that whoever controlled Delhi, ruled India.

A Tale of Chivalry

Lal Hanumant Singh of Dharupur in Awadh gave shelter to Captain Barrow, Deputy Commissioner of Salone, in his fort. A fortnight later Hanumant Singh and five hundred of his men escorted the captain to Allahabad. While taking leave of the gallant Rajput, Captain Barrow expressed a hope that the Raja would help the government in suppressing the revolt. Lal Hanumant Singh replied : "Sahib, your countrymen came into this country and drove out our king. At one blow you took from me lands which from time immemorial had been in my family. Suddenly misfortune fell upon you. The people of the land rose against you. You came to me whom you had despoiled. I have saved you. But now…now I march at the head of my men to Lakhnao to try and drive you from the country."
— From the Annals of the Indian Rebellion

European Rebels

Eyewitness reports indicate that the cavalry officer who was directing the artillery fire against the British in Awadh near the Kukrail river was a European. According to a publication, "The Seige of Delhi by an Officer Who Served There" published in Edinburgh in 1861, a European deserter accompanied the sepoys from Meerut to Delhi, and fought and died in the Battle of Budli-ki-Sarai. The second in command, of the rebel forces in Delhi, was a European officer who had come to Delhi with the Bareilly Brigade. On the day Delhi fell, this man, a sergeant-major, was seen riding from post to post, trying to rally the dejected sepoys and bringing up fresh troops. According to Forbes-Mitchele, the officer later fled to Nepal along with his sepoys. When many of the sepoys returned to their homes he lamented that he had neither home nor country to return to. Sadly, none of the contemporary reports mentions the names of these Europeans who threw in their lot with the Indians.

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