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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Escalating the war against the farmers, the collector of Bardoli ordered that all the moveable property of those who had refused to pay tax should be attached. As moveable property included buffaloes some of these animals were dragged away to the police station. Buffalo owners quickly dragged their buffaloes into their homes and shut the doors. The animals were kept locked in for weeks together. Minor government officials, eager to please their superiors searched desperately for animals to take away. One official was so unrelenting in his quest to seek out and confiscate buffaloes that Patel named him "Buffalo Tiger".
The officials then started attaching other property like pots and pans and other cooking vessels. Patel told the people that they should neither cooperate nor obstruct these officials. He asked people to show total disinterestedness — not even to gather to watch while a house was being raided by the officials.
Months passed. Lands were attached. People were arrested. But there was not a single act of violence in Bardoli.
When the government started auctioning the lands it had confiscated, several voices were raised in protest. Vithalbhai Patel, president of the Imperial Legislative Assembly and K.M. Munshi, an eminent lawyer and member of the legislative council of Bombay, expressed sympathy with the Bardoli satyagrahis and urged the government to act honourably towards them.
The government finally backed down. On 6 August 1928, it agreed to release all prisoners, return the confiscated property and cancel the hike in taxes. The farmers agreed to pay taxes at the old rate.
When property was being confiscated in Bardoli, Gandhiji had observed: "The people of Bardoli, if they are brave will be none the worse for dispossession. They will have lost their possessions but kept what must be the dearest of all to good men and women -- their honour. Those who have stout hearts and hands need never fear loss of belongings."
Apparently as Louis Fischer noted, "the Mahatma thought every peasant was a Gandhi."
Fischer also noted that "strangely enough, the judgement (of Gandhi) did not err. A spark of Gandhism lifted the peasantry into a mood of sacrifice."
Bardoli reinforced Gandhiji's faith in the peasantry. Now he was ready to emerge from his self-imposed isolation from political activities and take on the British again.

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