Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

In the Northwest and the Eastern provinces where Muslims were in a majority there was no enthusiasm for a separate Muslim country at first. The people in these provinces felt that it would be enough if the provinces were given more autonomy.
If the Muslim League was finally successful in winning over a large number of Muslims to its cause it was because it preyed on and exploited the natural fears of a minority community. The irresponsible utterances of the Hindu Mahasabha only served to increase the sense of insecurity of the Muslims.
The British who until 1942 had not hesitated to use the 'Divide and Rule' policy were apparently smitten by conscience. They were now in favour of one strong united India. The Cabinet Mission came out with several schemes which visualised the formation of one federation in which Muslim interests would be protected. Several rounds of talks were held between the Muslim League and the Congress but neither side was prepared to see the other's point of view or concede that some of the other's fears may be genuine. When the talks failed to produce results, the Muslim League gave a call for direct action.
The hartal on 16 August 1946 passed off peacefully all over the country except Calcutta where Muslims clashed with Hindus. Ten thousand people died and a lakh were rendered homeless.
Communal riots then broke out in Noakhali in Bengal. Here Hindus were at the receiving end and thousands of them fled to Bihar. The Hindus of Bihar were enraged and turned on the Muslims in their province. When the communal fire threatened to engulf the whole nation, a one-man peace army descended on Noakhali, in the person of Mahatma Gandhi.
In Noakhali, Gandhiji walked from village to village knocking at the doors of Muslims and asking to be allowed to stay with them. If the door was slammed in his face, he would move on to the next house. He would stay in each village until the Muslims agreed to protect their Hindu neighbours. Others who had come with him scattered over the district and each one, following Gandhiji's example, stayed in a village till peace was restored there.
In the meantime an interim government was formed at the centre with Jawaharlal Nehru at its head.
Freedom was imminent but the dark clouds of communalism had gathered over the subcontinent and now more than ever the country needed Gandhiji's healing touch and guidance.

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