Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

When it appeared that no Indian leader would stand by Hume in his hour of crisis, support came from Bal Gangadhar Tilak. Writing in the Mahratta, Tilak described the Bombay Standing Committee's action to disown Hume's letter as hasty and showing a lack of courage.
"Whatever we may think of Mr. Hume and his circular," Tilak concluded, "nothing will induce the Congress Party to disown a man, who is justly regarded as the Father of the Indian National Congress."
In 1894, Hume bade farewell to India and left for England. In the farewell speech he gave in Bombay Hume said: "Let nothing discourage you... many years may pass during which apparently you gain no single inch...may... even lose ground... but...work on ceaselessly, and India shall one day reap a glorious harvest of your labours... hammer, hammer, hammer—never relaxing your efforts...you can work at high pressure for a week, but to run at low pressure, uniformly and unwearyingly for a year... is the very first requisite for political success."
Hume continued to work relentlessly for India's cause in England until his death in 1912.

Awake

Sons of Ind, why sit ye idle,
Wait ye for some Deva's aid?
Buckle to, be up and doing!
Nations by themselves are made!

Are ye Serfs or are ye Freemen,
Ye that grovel in the shade?
In your own hands restir the issues!
By themselves are nations made!

Ye are taxed, what voice in spending
Have ye when the tax is paid?
Up! Protest! Right triumphs ever!
Nations by themselves are made!

What avail your wealth, your learning,
Empty titles, sordid trade?
True self-rule were worth them all!
Nations by themselves are made!

Are ye dazed, or are ye children,
Thee, that crouch, supine, afraid?
Will your childhood last for ever?
By themselves are nations made!

Ask no help from Heaven or Hell!
In yourselves alone seek aid!
He that wills, and dares, has all;
Nations by themselves are made!

Sons of Ind, be up and doing,
let your course be by none stayed;
Lo! the Dawn is in the East;
By themselves are nations made!
— A poem by A.O. Hume

       Go to   Previous Page

Liked This Article? Then Rate It.

 Select A
 DIMDIMA Site

 

 


Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Testimonials | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us |  Link to Us | Links | Advertise with Us
Copyright © 2014 dimdima.com. All Rights Reserved.